In Japan, it is traditional for women to offer chocolate to the men in their lives on Valentine’s day. Different types of chocolates exist for different relations, raging from “obligatory chocolate” for a boss or a work colleague to “true feeling chocolate” given to a husband or boyfriend. Men reciprocate one month later on White day, March 14th, and offer gifts and chocolates in return to the people who gave them chocolate on St Valentine’s day.

The tradition is the same in Korea, with the addition of “Black day” on April 14th. On that day, single people who didn’t receive any gift or chocolate either on St Valentine’s day or White day, meet in restaurants to commiserate and eat white noodles in black bean sauce. In South Korea, in fact, the 14th of each month is being marked for a special celebration such as Rose day on May 14th or Kiss day on June 14th.

In Taïwan, the tradition is the opposite with women receiving gifts on St Valentine’s day and men on White day.

St Valentine’s day is celebrated in Denmark and Norway with funny little poems or rhyming love notes given anonymously by men to women. The only clue as to the name of the sender is represented with a dot for each letter of the name. If the woman guesses the name of the sender accurately, she wins an Easter egg on Easter day. If she doesn’t, she owes the sender an Easter egg.

In Slovenia, if love is celebrated on St Valentine’s day, it is actually on March 12th that most people celebrate love.

Finnish and Estonian people celebrate friendship rather than love on St Valentine’s day, exchanging gifts and cards with friends. It is however a popular day to get engaged or married.

In Wales, the patron saint of lovers, St Dwynwen, is celebrated on January 25th. On this day, men traditionally present the woman they are interested in with a carved spoon symbolizing their love.

This is an extract from the following article found here.

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