The magic roundabout

The magic roundabout

You can find roundabouts in most countries. It’s a simple way to allow traffic from different roads to move into other roads.

Back in 1972, the British Road Transport Department created an experimental “multi-mini” roundabout, which consisted of 5 mini roundabouts connected together. They say that anybody who survives this roundabout deserves a medal. Here is is.

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Click here for the Swindon Magic Roundabout page !

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Horrible Histories is a BBC TV show for children based on a series of books. It describes historical facts and includes all the ‘unpleasant’ parts of the stories so that children find it interesting.

The TV show was a great success because it was funny and interesting. Children and adults loved it. It covered many different historical periods and gave them names such as:

  • The Savage Stone Age
  • The Groovy Greeks
  • The Rotten Romans
  • The Vicious Vikings
  • The Stormin’ Normans
  • The Measly Middle Ages
  • The Terrible Tudors
  • The Vile Victorians
  • The Frightful First World War
  • The Woeful Second World War

Here is the scene about William the Conqueror and his wife Matilda. They were married for 30 years and had 11 children, but their romance had a difficult start.

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In the 1980s, a TV show called Fawlty Towers became very popular in the UK and is considered a classic nowadays.

It is set in a hotel in England, with an ‘unorthodox’, slightly racist manager (played by John Cleese), and a staff of funny personnel including a Spanish waiter (played by British actor Andrew Sachs). Manuel is learning English and this leads to confusion and hilarious situations. This is a short extract from one of the most famous episodes.

I hope you enjoy it.

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  I found this interesting article about the expression “Bless you!” on an American site. The link to the full article is just after the text, in case you want to learn more …

Atchoo !

Many people have become accustomed to saying “bless you” or “gesundheit” when someone sneezes.         No-one says anything when someone coughs, blows their nose or burps, so why do sneezes get special treatment? What do those phrases actually mean, anyway?

Wishing someone well after they sneeze probably originated thousands of years ago. The Romans would say “Jupiter preserve you” or “Salve,” which meant “good health to you,” and the Greeks would wish each other “long life.” The phrase “God bless you” is attributed to Pope Gregory the Great, who uttered it in the sixth century during a bubonic plague epidemic (sneezing is an obvious symptom of one form of the plague).

The exchangeable term “gesundheit” comes from Germany, and it literally means “health.” The idea is that a sneeze typically precedes illness. It entered the English language in the early part of the 20th century, brought to the United States by German-speaking immigrants.

http://people.howstuffworks.com/sneezing.htm

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